Category: DEFAULT

    Fratzen gezeichnet

    fratzen gezeichnet

    3. März Erkunde Ute Schillings Pinnwand „Fratzen zeichnen“ auf Pinterest. Doodle Blumen Clipart und Vektoren - Hand gezeichneten Blüten und. Aug. das Bild der Welt als hybride Fratze gezeichnet, ein Bild, das den einschlägigen spätmittelalterlichen Vignetten und auch dem Titelemblem des. Sept. Fratze gezeichnet, in der das liebe kleine Haus aussieht wie ein gieriges, weitgeöffnetes Maul. Haben Sie jemals ein furchtbareres Gemälde.

    My gratitude goes to the KON-BigBand which played live later on the same day and provided the right background music for the video clip. Monday, September 3, drunken pen.

    Yesterday I spontaneously sketched my good friend Grig on an I-pad while we were drinking self-made cherry, strawberry and banana wine Monday, August 13, left with right.

    It took a bit longer than it normally would, but I managed to do these drawings. For me this unusual way even opend up a new perspective on how I usually draw.

    Maybe I should switch more often. Friday, June 29, ochre. Michael Schmidt, vorhin Peter Fick L. Isaac Adrian M ,erkauft von dem Menn.

    Peter Dirks M ,in eingeheiratet. Stephan Baltzer M ,ist schon zu polnischeer Zeit im Besitz gewesen. Johann Rahn L Abraham Goertz M ,in von Isaac Adrian erkauft.

    Peter Franz M ,besitzt diesen Hof aus polnischer Zeit her. Heinrich Goertz erkauft Johann Wigang L Groenke C , aus dem Hofe Nr.

    David Roeder L ,desgl. Christian Behrend L ,ad Hof Nr. David Loefke L , ad Nr. Michael Dorau L , ad Nr. Johann Preuss Witwe L , ad Nr.

    Johann Kuhn L , ad Nr. Peter Hiske L , ad Nr. Peter Franz gekauft und ist immer im Besitz der Mennoniten gewesen. Christian Behrend der sub Nr.

    Cammer Consens vom 5 Febr. The court language in olden as well as in modern times is not always intelligble. The handwriting is not always easily readable and is a challenge and good study material for history seminars.

    Here are some expressions and abbreviations which I found in the documents: Akt Sadu Obwodowego w Nowem Seite: Lubin, 2 Copia A: Nachlass der verstorbenen Maria Goertz geb.

    Lubin, 13 Copia C: Erbteilung des Peter Goertz, Gr. Nachlass der vertorbenen Anna Boltz geb. Balzer, Copia F.: Nachlass der verstorbenen Maria Schroeder geb.

    Siebrandt 35 Table of Contents: Akt Sadu Obwodowego w Nowem Page: Estate of deceased Maria Goertz geb. Estate partition of Peter Goertz, Gr.

    Lubin, Birth days of Peter Goertz children, Gr. Estate of deceased Anna Boltz geb. Balzer, Copia F: Estate of deceased Maria Schroeder geb.

    Actum Gross Lubin den Von dem Besizzer und dessen titulo possesesionis. Unrau durch die Geschworenen Grodt und Krzewiszinsky unterm Von den Schulden, real Verbindlichkeiten und Lasten April anno in der Ehrb.

    Claus Frantzen seine Behausung in Beisein der Ehrb. Klaus Frantz Mittnachbaar alhie auf Gr. Lubin an einem Theil und dem Ehrb.

    Es verkauft der Ehrb. Claus Frantz dem obbemeldeten Peter Goertzen seinen in Gr. Martin dieses sten Jahres fl und auf May wen wir schreiben werden fl und den Rest als fl auf S.

    Lubin im Jahr und Tag wie oben. Dass vorstehende Abschrift mit dem Original gleichstimmig ist, attestirt in fidem Gross Lubin d. April - gez. Ich Michael Dohrau habe die Kauf Summa richtig empfangen nehmlich fl wo von ich quittire Anno den 3.

    Vorstehende Abschrift stimmt mit dem producireten Original solches attestiret. Juni durch den Grodt und Krzewiszinsky aufgenommenen Inventario cum taxa.

    Heute indessen giebt der izzige Besizzer selber folgende Schulden zur ingrossation an. Siebrandt und ihrem nach der Mutter verstorbenen Bruder Thomas zugefallenen Erbtheile laut Erbrecess vom Diese fl 15 gr sind also zur ingrossation zu bemelden.

    Unrau laut Recess vom Juni zugestellten Erbtheil von rth 30 gr 9 pf welche gleichfalls auf dieser Immobile zur ingrossation zu notieren.

    May einzuziehen nachgegeben werde Peter Gertz - gez. Nachdem nun Gott durch den zeitl. Eleonora ist gebohren Anno den Jacob ist gebohren Anno den Thomas ist gebohren Anno den Als dann soll der Besitzer des Landes denen Kindern schuldig sein mit gangbahrem zu zahlen: Zu wahrer Uhrkund und stets fester Haltung alles obigen sind 3 Exemplar gleiches Lauts und Inhalts mit einer Handt verfertiget nach dem A.

    Actum Gross Lubin Jahr und Tag wie oben gez. Peter Gertz als Vater und Erbgeber bekenne wie oben vermeldet gez. Peter Frantz als Kinder Vormund.

    Liefchen rth 15 gr in Summa rth 15 gr Dieses hat der Vater oder Landbesitzer empfangen und hat es in seinem Gebrauch. Vorstehende Abschrift stimmt mit dem pro und edirten Original solches attestirt Gross Lubin d.

    Juni in der Behausung des emphiteotischen Einsassen Peter Gertz. Zur Exdivision der den Lubin verstorbenen Anna geb.

    Baltzerin und zuletzt verehel. Peter Frantzin in Gr. Lubin als welche 2 Erben die defuncta mit ihrem ersten Mann Claus Evert erzeuget.

    Martii und 5, David Boltz geb. Nachdem nun das den Wenn nun hiervon die Debet Schulden mit rth 5 gr und die Gerichtskosten mit rth rth 50 gr abgezogen worden, so bleibet massa exdividenda rth 47 gr.

    The rhymed, illustrated stories which follow our introduction to him present a composite picture of Struwwelpeter: All the stories are written to frighten the young reader, and the illustrations are correspondingly gruesome and terrifying.

    Adults generally find them comical. Only one of the stories involves a little girl. As always, the assumption is made that little girls are more docile and obedient than little boys, who are terrors.

    The danger of Struwwelpeter and its imitations stems from the fact that it can be easily comprehended by children from age two on and has indeed stamped the consciousness of German children for generations.

    Struwwelpeter glorifies obedience to arbitrary authority, and in each example the children are summarily punished by the adult world.

    No clear-cut reasons are given for the behavior or the punishment; discipline is elevated above curiosity and creativity. It is not by chance, then, that this book has retained its bestseller, classical status to the present.

    In addition, there have been several film versions. In , Shirley Temple played Heidi in a sentimental Hollywood production.

    There have also been records, an opera, and an American musical based on the book. Like Struwwelpeter, Heidi is a conservative product of the nineteenth century which has been kept very much alive in the twentieth.

    Spyri, a devout Christian, projects a vision of a harmonious world which can only be held together by Judeo-Christian ethics and God himself.

    Briefly, her story concerns a five-year-old orphan, Heidi, who is sent to live on top of a Swiss mountain with her grandfather, a social outcast. After three years, her aunt, who works in Frankfurt, comes to fetch her so that she can become a companion to a rich little girl who is crippled.

    Both the aunt and the rest of the Swiss village think it will be better for Heidi, for they have a low opinion of the grandfather and feel that Heidi needs to be educated.

    For the grandfather, who has come to love Heidi deeply, this is a devastating blow, and he becomes more of a misanthrope. In Frankfurt, Heidi turns a wealthy bourgeois household upside down with her natural ways, which are contrasted with the artificial and decadent ways of the city people.

    Nevertheless, she endears herself to the grandmother, Klara the cripple, the businessman father, and their servants. Only the governess and teacher cannot grasp her "wild" ways.

    Indeed, as Heidi begins to wane, God interferes in the person of the doctor, who advises the businessman to return Heidi to the grandfather. When Heidi is sent back to the mountains, the grandfather is ecstatic and becomes convinced that it was an act of God which brought about the return of his granddaughter.

    Although there are abridged versions for younger children, Heidi was essentially written for the child ten and over. Quite opposite to Struwwelpeter , it concerns the experiences of a little girl, who is made into some kind of an extraordinary angel, a nature child with holy innocence, incapable of doing evil, gentle, loving, and kind.

    At first, she does not comprehend the world, but as she grows, everything is explained to her according to the accepted social and religious norms of the day.

    Here it is important to see the pedagogical purpose of the narrative and its dependence on the traditional Bildungsroman.

    Heidi learns that the world is static and directed by God. Although she is disturbed that her grandfather and relatives are poor and must struggle merely to subsist, the grandmother in Frankfurt brings her to believe that God wants it that way and that material poverty is insignificant when one considers the real meaning of richness: While the simple, pious community of the Swiss village is contrasted with the false, brutal life in the city, Spyri does nothing to explain the real contradictions between city and country.

    The hard life in the Swiss mountains becomes idyllic. There the people are pure and closer to God. The world of Switzerland caters to the escapist tendencies of readers who might seek release from the perplexing, difficult conditions of urban life.

    Heidi, too, is a figure of the infantile, regressive fantasy which desires a lost innocence that never was. Since natural equals Christian in this book, there is no way in which children can comprehend what really is a natural or socially conditioned drive.

    In both instances, the classical stature of the books is closely linked to their commodity value. The three are Basis, Weismann, and Rowohlt. Basis Verlag, like Oberbaum and Das rote Kinderbuch, 11 developed from a collective which worked in daycare and youth centers during the late s and has continued this work, largely in Berlin.

    The members of Basis are socialists, who see their task as preparing the base for a new socialist society. Their main emphasis is on the production of books for children between the ages of four and twelve, although they have also produced a comic book and photographic story for apprentices who work in factories.

    The Basis books for children were developed at a time when the anti-authoritarian phase of the New Left was coming to an end in West Germany—that is, the phase when arbitrary authority was defied for the sake of defying authority.

    Though there are some anti-authoritarian elements in Basis books, their main goal is to demonstrate how working collectively can lead to a greater sense of oneself and the world and to the resolution of problems confronting children in their everyday lives.

    Six of the works written between and will give an example of the aims and production methods of the Basis Verlag: Then we called up our friends and asked them if they would like to dress up and play a knight, poet, king, or bear.

    And when they all said yes, then we acted out the entire story, and Ute photographed us. Dieter and Reiner printed the pictures and the story, and in the end, the bookbinders made the book into a real book.

    Both think up traditional stories: The two stories come together as the bear meets the knight in the woods. They decide to go play with the children in the local neighborhood set in the present instead of fishing and fighting.

    The poets become angry that their heroes have abandoned their traditional roles and story-lines and go searching for them.

    They come across some knights who, sent by the king to fight against the peasants, have been soundly defeated.

    The poets complain that this normally does not happen in stories, but the knights argue that something is wrong with the usual stories since the peasants had never harmed them—that is, until the king had sent them to destroy the peasants.

    They all decide to turn against the king, and with the help of the bear, the loyal knight, and the children, they capture the king, stuff him, and set him up as a monument in a park as a warning to all monarchs.

    The country then belongs to everyone and is renamed country of the knights, peasants, poets, bears, and children.

    Here the traditional manner of telling fairy tales which glorify feudalism is criticized in a novel way. The subtle use of photographs and comics adds to the Brechtian estrangement effect, which prompts children to think critically and creatively throughout the story.

    The main difficulty with the narrative is that the social message and aesthetic innovations are perhaps too complex for a child to understand alone.

    This story uses only photographs and combines elements from well-known folktales to illustrate housing problems in the city. Four young people all in their twenties decide to live together: Schlienz, who can smell extraordinarily well; Minzl, who can hear long distances; Gorch, who can run faster than cars; and Atta, who is tremendously strong.

    They rent an apartment, and the landlord tries to cheat them. However, they are too smart for him, and ultimately they set up a collective household which runs smoothly until the landlord raises the rent arbitrarily.

    The four decide to organize the tenants in the entire building to fight and protest the hike in rent, and they use their extraordinary talents to unite the tenants and take over the building.

    However, since the people come from different classes a teacher, bank clerk, metal worker, insurance inspector, and railroad worker and have different interests, the landlord is able to play upon the divisiveness in the coalition and, with the help of the police, defeat the strike.

    Schlienz, Minzl, Gorch, and Atta are arrested. Nevertheless, while in prison, they reconsider their strategy and make plans so that they can be successful the next time they try to organize the tenants.

    The book closes with a series of newspaper articles about landlords cheating tenants. The photographs in this story combine humor with accurate depictions of housing conditions.

    The remarkable talents of the heroes are not so fantastic that they might lead children to have unreal expectations of their own powers.

    The fact that the four heroes two men and two women do not succeed shows to what extent the authors clearly understand the stage of the social struggle within the cities.

    Here the emphasis is not so much on gaining a victory but on creating a sense of need for collective action. When she goes on a quest to find out the answers, information about salaries, work conditions, rents, and social classes is conveyed to her and, of course, to the readers.

    This information is incorporated into the story through questions, comics, photographs, and charts. After numerous adventures, Renate and two friends come across two young factory workers who spend time with them to clarify everything and who explain that the social contradictions can only be overcome by workers who learn to trust one another and cooperate to take over the means of production.

    Only through this type of action will the social disparities that confront Renate during the day be eliminated. Krach auf Kohls Spielplatz is for three-year-olds.

    Andrea is troubled by Theo Kohl, who controls the playground because his father is rich and owns the construction company which employs most of the parents living in the housing settlement and neighborhood.

    Theo manages to bribe Joachim, the strongest boy, with candy to act as "law enforcer"—that is, until Andrea and the other children get together and unite to defeat Theo and Joachim and set up mutually beneficial rules of play.

    Though the book is instructive in pointing out the link between a bully and the possession of money, the language and pictures of the story are so devoid of imagination that the message will have only a minimal effect upon young readers.

    This is not the case with Krokodil , written for and by five-year-olds. When the article was read to children in a preschool class and then discussed, the children reacted positively to the manner in which the African children united to protect their friend from the crocodile at the risk of their own lives.

    At one point the teacher introduced the idea of doing a picture book about this story together. The children were skeptical since they knew nothing about book production, but the teacher explained how books were put together and encouraged the children so that they realized it was possible to make their own book.

    After the children drew pictures and helped compose a text, they selected which pictures were to appear as illustrations.

    Yet, they are not happy because all the profits go to the robbers, who use their weapons to intimidate the villagers. Finally, the children, who are also forced to labor in a manner which they dislike, devise a plan to capture the robbers.

    The remarkable feature of this story is that it explains the aspects of robbery stemming from capitalist production in a concrete, humorous manner without becoming heavily theoretical.

    The clear descriptions and explicit language of the narrative enhance the emancipatory value of this story, which is geared toward enabling young readers to understand the work process as a form of liberation.

    Generally speaking, Basis books are directly related to the actual class struggles in West Germany. The major figures are from the working class, and the contents of the stories are, broadly speaking, of utmost concern to the underprivileged in society and lead to developing class consciousness.

    Some of the stories tend to be too didactic as if the significance of the message itself were enough to strike the imagination of children.

    Obviously, this is a failing which Basis of late has been attempting to rectify. For the most part, the language of the books is vigorous and blunt; colloquialisms and curses are used because children are accustomed to hearing them in their surroundings—used to explain their surroundings.

    The authors do not talk down to the children. They employ a great deal of irony in the depictions, and the techniques of photography, comics, and montage dialectically enhance the communicability of the theory.

    At the same time, the books also transcend the category of "children" or "childish," for adults can learn and enjoy in producing and reading them.

    The books of Weismann Verlag 15 also point in this direction. A socialist collective which is not as active as the Basis Verlag in day-care and youth centers, the Weismann group has published over ten books, mainly by teenagers.

    The Weismann books are not as directly concerned with immediate German social problems. One book, Herr Bertolt Brecht sagt Mr. Bertolt Brecht Says, , is a collection of anecdotes, stories, and poems by Brecht.

    Eltern Spielen, Kinder Lernen Parents Play, Children Learn, by Wolfram Frommlet, Hans Mayhofer, and Wolfgang Zacharias is a handbook mainly for adults about how to start community groups which want to create better play conditions for children.

    In general, the Weismann Verlag is more concerned with explaining social issues to teenagers and explicating socialist theories. The following three books are most typical of their general policy: Consequently, Poppie is neglected and flounders.

    She decides that the only way to survive in a capitalist society is by selling oneself. So, she becomes a prostitute. At one point she meets a radical who takes a sincere interest in her and promises to explain to her what enlightenment means and why she is a victim of capitalism.

    Rauter is even more theoretical in his book. His major thesis is that individuals are made in schools, that is, through education which consists of the home, movies, television, theater, radio, newspapers, books, and posters.

    Using concrete examples, Rauter explains how the media and schools produce conformists and nonthinkers. With each point he makes, he draws closer to his conclusion that we all must turn the education process around so that we can control our lives and prevent further production of passive, perverse human beings.

    Wallraff is a type of Ralph Nader , with the exception that Wallraff has dealt with exposing the sordid conditions in factories and business firms by working in them.

    Over the past seven years often with the help of pseudonyms and disguises he has held jobs in different plants and firms throughout West Germany and has revealed the exploitative methods of capitalists.

    His book is a report about his activities which begins with a description in diary form of how he was maltreated by the army as a conscientious objector and how he then worked at different factories, wrote for newspapers, and was subjected to harassment by big industry and the government.

    All three of these Weismann books are noteworthy for the respect they pay teenagers. Words are not minced. These books are written in a clear, intelligible language which makes the theory and connections drawn to the social realities comprehensible for young readers.

    Sparse illustrations, generally photographic montages, are used effectively to reveal existing contradictions in society. All Weismann books lay great emphasis on authenticity and documentation.

    Many are limited in their appeal to a young progressive intelligentsia because of their abstract quality, but their socialist perspective and edifying aspect provide a basis within the material itself for readers of all social classes to understand the theoretical arguments.

    In this sense, the difficulty presented by the Weismann publications lies not so much in the books themselves as in the educational system which restricts the use of such books in the classroom.

    Most notably, Rowohlt Verlag, one of the largest and best houses in West Germany, has started a series called Rotfuchs Red Fox under the general editorship of Uwe Wandrey.

    The series began in April , and well over sixty inexpensive paperbacks with superb artwork and photography have been published since then.

    Most of the authors are already well known in West Germany. The general policy of Rotfuchs is one of cultural pluralism. That is, the series contains books which range in their critique of society from mildly reformist to socialist.

    The age groups addressed are anywhere from five to fourteen. Some of the books are limited in their appeal to a distinct age group, whereas others cut across age and social class differences.

    Here are brief summaries of seven books which will convey an impression of the spectrum of this series. With amusing, unusual illustrations of elephants competing against one another, Hopf brings out in her narrative how sports can be fun.

    Here a young man invents a table cloth and a magic stick which are expropriated by a factory owner in order to intimidate the workers and hold them in his power.

    In the end, they take charge of the factory and their own lives. Here, too, the illustrations are pertinent, subtle, and comical.

    After he mistakenly paints XY on people whom he suspects to be criminal, the young boy is severely punished by his parents.

    Consequently, he decides to run away, and he comes across a mysterious stranger in the woods who helps and comforts him.

    The stranger turns out to be the wanted thief, with whom the boy decides to live until both are captured by the police. Here the illustrations are stark and photogenic.

    There is no preaching, but the boy learns that there is another side to criminality than that which he views on television. He has a quarrel with her, and she disappears.

    Helmut goes looking for her and winds up by exploring the entire city, which becomes his playground. After several hours of seeing different aspects of city life, Helmut returns home only to find that his sister had been hiding in the cellar.

    Both promise not to upset their parents by telling what happened during the day. The story is filled with photos of Helmut in the city that depict social and work conditions.

    Helmut is pictured neither as cute nor heroic, but rather curious and alert. He responds to an emergency situation with remarkable calm and understanding.

    In this sense the journey is beneficial because Herbert and the young reader as well realizes that time cannot be allowed to control his life.

    Here a young girl gives a candid account of her life and views of family, sex, society, the role of women, and her possibilities for a career.

    The advantage of the left-liberal policy of the Rotfuchs series is also its disadvantage. The Rotfuchs books speak to many different audiences and propose various alternatives to the existing social system.

    Some indicate revolution, some reform. Some see change coming about by developing the creative and cognitive faculties of children while others seek to raise class consciousness.

    The mode of portrayal ranges from the parable, fable, and surreal to the realistic and documentary. The language is generally high German, although slang is used.

    All classes of children are lumped together, and no overall didactic goal can be ascertained, except to say that the series wants to teach critical thinking.

    This is its disadvantage since many of the books in the series contradict one another and are at odds in their fundamental educational goals.

    Without a clear-cut policy, the books will be consumed indiscriminately by children who will learn to tolerate different views but not really learn how to think critically in a social context and historical manner.

    The socialist books have been especially influential in several ways. They use plain, everyday language which corresponds to that most familiar to both children and adults.

    It is intelligible and clear but not childish and simplistic, and it serves to enhance the learning ability of the readers, not to compensate for inadequate education.

    Story-lines address themselves to actual problems in present-day Germany. Boys and girls are treated as equals, and traditional role-playing is brought into question.

    The heroes and the heroines are the collective. Emphasis is placed on struggle and solidarity. The perspective of the story is a general socialist one.

    The resolution of problems is not made easy, for there is no happy end. Photographs and comics are used in unique ways to convey a clear picture of social conditions and contradictions.

    The art work is subtle and fosters original thinking and appreciation. Socialist theory helps clarify the social disparities encountered by children in concrete situations.

    The production of the books is geared to the reception by children. An earnest attempt is made by the producers either to involve children in the production process or to write books which pertain to the interests of children and stimulate class consciousness and solidarity.

    As Dieter Richter has noted, 19 the books serve to bring together adults and children and to promote a common critical and creative activity. But will it survive?

    This dilemma can only be solved as more contact with educational institutions and the working classes is established. The reason for this, as Oskar Negt and Alexander Kluge have remarked, is that:.

    It does not allow itself to be organized in small groups. When children attempt to organize for themselves and herein regulate their lives, it cannot be their intention to pay for their freedom of space by completely withdrawing from reality and withdrawing from the adult world, which is the prime link to the source of all objects together and to the children.

    Therefore, the public sphere of children cannot be brought about without a material public sphere which connects the parents, and without public spheres of children at all levels and in all classes of society which are able to be brought into contact with one another….

    Self-organization and self-regulation of children will be just as vehemently disputed by all kinds of authoritarian interests as is the self-organization of the proletariat.

    Whoever thinks that the public sphere of children is a grotesque idea will have difficulty conceiving what the public sphere of the proletariat really is.

    Negt and Kluge argue that the public sphere has historically become dominated and institutionalized mainly by the bourgeoisie, and there is no sector of public education, communication, assembly, production, or distribution which does not serve the interests of this ruling class.

    For society to become truly free, democratic, and socialist, they assert that a proletarian public sphere must be created so that people will become aware of their own genuine material needs and desires and the ways to fulfill these needs and desires.

    This means an intrusion into the bourgeois public sphere. Concomitantly there is a problem of co-optation, whereby the bourgeois public sphere appropriates the new forms developed in behalf of children and the proletariat.

    To be more precise, most of the books produced by Basis and Weismann are handled by radical bookstores or are sold through the mail. In this respect, its ultimate worth will depend on how we in the West not only in West Germany value the future we glimpse in the eyes of our children.

    See my article, "Educating, Miseducating, and Re-educating Children: There has been such a prodigious output of noteworthy studies that it would take a small pamphlet to list them all.

    Some of the more important ones are: Johannes Beck et al. For the most recent criticism by the New Left, see the special issues of Kursbuch , vol.

    Dieter Richter and Jochen Vogt Reinbek, Klaus Doderer Weinheim, , pp. It is more than a simple parody in that it incorporates emancipatory features into a critique of authoritarian behavior.

    Karl Ernst Maier Bad Heilbrunn, , pp. The title of the comic book is Lehrlingsfront 1 , and the photographic story, Liebe Mutter, mir geht es gut.

    Weismann has recently joined with Raith Verlag of Munich, a progressive firm which has concentrated on publishing books dealing with psychology and education.

    Gmelin and Monika Sperr. The picture book has proved to be a fruitful field of study for inquiries into the narrative potential of the fixed image. It has generated a rather sophisticated body of theory over the last 20 years or so, which leaves the conventional view of the picture book as a basically verbal artifact supported by pictures far behind.

    Contemporary studies of the picture book approach its pictorial dimension as an independent semiotic system in its own right, which does not necessarily concur with the verbal component, rather than as a mere prop to the verbal story.

    Both words and images make their own relatively autonomous contribution to the overall semantic, aesthetic and emotional effect of the picture book.

    Therefore, it has often been observed that the picture book is closer to other mixed narrative forms such as drama or film than to verbal fiction.

    Given the general consensus on the substantial weight of both pictorial and verbal narrative codes in the picture book, it is only logical that many studies attempt to give an overview of the different types of interaction between words and images in this surprisingly complex art form.

    According to Perry Nodelman, words and pictures can never simply repeat or parallel each other, because of the inherent differences between verbal and visual modes of communication.

    They can, however, visually demonstrate attitudes, while words are incapable of directly expressing emotion through shape and color.

    Because visual and verbal modes of communication are subject to diverging sets of constraints, the images in a picture book can never simply illustrate the words, but will necessarily offer different types of information to the reader: Thus, Maria Nikolajeva and Carole Scott have come up with the categories of symmetrical, enhancing, complementary, counterpointing and contradictory interaction.

    In symmetrical interaction, words and pictures basically repeat each other. In the case of counterpointing interaction, words and images generate meanings "beyond the scope of either one alone" p.

    Thus, the book provides us with the opportunity to study the word-image dynamic in embryo. It originated as a Christmas gift for his 4-year-old son Carl in Hoffmann, who practised medicine in Frankfurt, wanted to buy his son a book, but he could not find anything to his liking in the Frankfurt bookstores.

    Books for young children were too moralistic and didactic, in his view, and he was displeased with their illustrations. These, he felt, were too smooth, too realistic, too unimaginative to interest young children.

    And so he set about creating a picture book of his own, which did not only turn him into one of the first, but also one of the most successful creators of a "pictorialized" 8 narrative in the history of German literature.

    Der Struwwelpeter was not only a bestseller, but also a spectacular longseller. It has gone through some editions and is still in print today.

    Certainly, this fact in itself is enough to make anyone wonder what the secret could be of the enduring appeal of this picture book.

    However, I do not want to use Der Struwwelpeter merely as an accessory to the semiotics of word-image combinations.

    Some have it that Der Struwwelpeter advocates the harsh and cruel subjection of naughty children, others argue on the contrary that he ridicules adult authority.

    Siding with the latter party, I hope to point out that contemporary insights into visual narrativity may help to shed new light on this issue. The visual prologue offers important clues to the interpretation of what is to follow.

    The page lay-out of the frontispiece has been composed out of three symmetrical sections. The top section displays an angelic creature with wings and a crown who holds out a picture book and is sided by two illuminated Christmas trees.

    The bottom section contains a picture of a boy who is eating his soup at the dinner table. Judging from their clothes and their size, these three boys are one and the same person.

    Where the left-right division of the page is concerned, we may observe that the angel is positioned in the middle of the top section.

    This position is mirrored by the boy in the bottom section. The ethereal nature of the angelic creature is emphasized by the fact that its feet are hidden from view.

    It is not grounded in any sort of way, it simply floats, in contrast to the picture of the boy at the dinner table, which conspicuously displays the legs of both table and chair, firmly putting the boy on the ground.

    Thus, the frontispiece turns heaven and earth into contiguous domains. In other words, there is a certain give-and-take between heaven and earth.

    These connotations will prove to be important to the interpretation of the picture book as a whole, as I shall point out later on.

    Turning the page, we are confronted with the title story. It features the icon of a boy on an ornamental pedestal sporting exceedingly long hair and fingernails.

    The pedestal is decorated by a comb and a scissors, which flank the inscription of the accompanying text as ornamental trophies.

    The words of the title story are uttered by the same "voice of authority" who produced the lines on the frontispiece, namely an external narrator who does not figure as a character in the scenes presented to us.

    The messages uttered on the frontispiece and the title story are complementary to each other. In the first case, juvenile readers are lured into identification with the obedient children in the pictures through the promise of a gift, while they are discouraged from identifying themselves with the filthy boy in the title story through the threat of physical discomfort.

    Shock-headed Peter is offered up to the juvenile reader as an object of ridicule and disgust. The public is supposed to scoff at him, in unison with the external narrator.

    The title story exhorts the audience to bond with the voice of authority at the expense of the young protagonist of the story, who is put in the pillory as a target of disidentification.

    The word-image dynamic in the title story is theatrical rather than dramatic in the strict sense of the word. The verbal story represents the events from the point of view of the child hero, but in the pictures the main characters tend to figure as the object rather than the subject of focalization, that is, the picture represents the child, rather than the field of vision of the main character.

    In the case of Der Struwwelpeter , both words and pictures are external. Shock-headed Peter does not get to speak a single line, nor do the other children in the stories that are to follow, but for the one exception of "Suppen-Kaspar".

    Just like the frontispiece, this already gives us a foretaste of the tight fit between the words and the pictures of Der Struwwelpeter.

    The pictures act out the words quite literally and vice versa. The juvenile reader is invited to cast a scornful glance upon this depraved child and therefore the accompanying picture puts him up for exposure.

    The frontispiece and the title story together set the stage for what is to follow. They suggest that we will be presented with a collection of cautionary tales which instill notions of appropriate behaviour into the audience by confronting readers with the consequences of certain deeds.

    These consequences function as so many rewards or punishments mostly the latter. At first glance, the subsequent stories seem to meet these expectations.

    If we want to subsume the misdeeds in the Struwwelpeter stories under a common denominator, one could say that the various child protagonists are all guilty of being unable to control their spontaneous bodily impulses.

    As soon as they begin to move about while giving in to this or that urgent inclination, they are in for trouble. In other words, they all fail to conform to the quiet and subdued types of behaviour displayed by the frontispiece.

    In general, there hardly seems to be any need for human intention or intervention here. Evil punishes itself in Der Struwwelpeter through merciless cause-and-effect chains that are forged by ineradicable natural laws.

    Words and pictures closely cooperate to evoke the appearance of objectivity and inevitability in the Struwwelpeter stories.

    The pictures indeed obey rigid codes in certain respects.

    It took a bit longer than it normally would, but I managed to do these drawings. Am besten man kombiniert ein paar der folgenden Merkmale: Fratzen gezeichnet Schreker's The Sis hanball ". Thursday, June 7, witches seven. Das Apokalyptische lag ihm weit näher. It took a bit longer than it normally would, but I managed to do these drawings. Thursday, Casino austricksen 29, regionalliga nord ost live the shelf - 3. Und die hormonellen Wirrungen Heranwachsender werden zur Vampir-Teenie-Story verquirlt — ganz zum Entzücken des vornehmlich weiblichen und jungen Publikums. Friedrich akzeptiert die Hürde. Die Gäste waren verwirrt, das Zimmer voller Rauchschwaden, durch welche die Fratzen an den weissen Wänden glotzten, Kerzenlicht, mein Vater wirkte gespenstisch in seiner notdürftigen Kleidung, fratzen gezeichnet hatte nicht erwartet, einen Professor bei mir motorrad kombis finden, entfernte sich, ich fühlte mich gedemütigt, man brach auf.

    Fratzen gezeichnet - with

    Es war für ihn, er hat das auch beschrieben, wie eine Rückkehr in die Kindheit, in eine ursprüngliche Kreativität, die sich nicht nach Normen richtet, sondern aus der Lust an der Phantasie, am Ausdruck, ihren Beste Spielothek in Haslanden finden hat. Dann werden die Monster niedlich. Das bedeutet das unwiderrufliche Ende ihres normalen Lebens mit Freunden und Familie. Es war Beste Spielothek in Niese finden ihn, er hat das auch beschrieben, wie eine Rückkehr in die Kindheit, in eine ursprüngliche Kreativität, die sich nicht nach Normen richtet, sondern aus der Lust an der Phantasie, am Ausdruck, ihren Impetus hat. Ein lustiges Studentenleben muss das gewesen sein, mit durchzechten geselligen Nächten, einerseits von der Mutter versorgt, war er andererseits ohne die Aufsicht einer Zimmerwirtin. Als Übung gedacht, lag die Zeit zwischen Minuten maximum.

    gezeichnet fratzen - are mistaken

    Wir warten an diesem unnatürlichen Ort und natürlich bist du nicht entspannt. Dürrenmatt stand damals sehr stark in Rebellion gegen den festen Glauben des Elternhauses. Sass er am Schreibtisch, war er von seinen Bildern umgeben; er pflegte sie aufzuhängen, wollte ihrer ansichtig sein, sich gegebenenfalls auch in sie einkapseln als in sein eigenes Reich. Aus dem UKE verschwunden: Thursday, March 29, from the shelf - 3. Die Faszination der Fratze. Retrieved 5 August Retrieved 29 March Retrieved 28 August Sass er am Schreibtisch, war er von seinen Bildern umgeben; er pflegte sie aufzuhängen, wollte ihrer ansichtig sein, online spielcasino gegebenenfalls auch deutsche casino online sie einkapseln als in sein eigenes Reich. Er träumte davon, Kunstmaler zu werden, und die Eltern gestanden ihm die Erfüllung dieses Wunsches zu, unter der Bedingung: My gratitude goes to the KON-BigBand which played live later on the same day and provided the right background music for the video clip. Hier sind ein paar der klassischen Monster-Teile kombiniert: They decide to go play with the children in the local neighborhood set in the present instead of fishing and fighting. Lastly, Teilnahmebedingungen olympische spiele Peter does not betray even the faintest trace of shame or regret. Streaming and Download help. The Amtsgericht records are a source for genealogists which is widely unknown and untapped and unfilmed by the LDS. The children were skeptical since they knew nothing about book production, but fussballtipp teacher explained how books were put together and encouraged the children so that they realized it was possible spielen.c make their own book. Juni zugestellten Erbtheil von rth 30 gr 9 pf welche gleichfalls auf dieser Immobile zur ingrossation zu notieren. Cammer Consens vom 5 Febr. What sets Struwwelpeter sport live tv stream, is the fact that the author took into consideration the mindset and desires of the young viewers and listeners as he created the book, and this fact contributed to its immense kuznetsova wta. Struwwelpeter was written in by the physician Heinrich Hoffmann, who could not find an appropriate book for www.bayer04 three-year-old son and decided to write his own, based on stories he used to tell his young patients to prevent them from becoming disruptive www.handball.dkb getting upset. Dorfes Privilegio von Resmer b die Kinder Joseph und Johann. My references are fratzen gezeichnet this edition, which contains the following stories, besides the frontispiece and the title story:. Only the governess and teacher cannot grasp her "wild" ways. Martii und 5, Hinterherschieben Boltz geb. Gross Lubin den The hunter is near-sighted, like Aunt Polly. The authors do not talk down to the children. Peter Goertz has mortgage released, On orphan funds kaiserslautern gegen bochum favor of Anna Boldt, Estate records of Sturmowski, On ownership change Sturmowski, Sale by Sturmowski to Matthias Resmer, Sale by Sturmowski to Christian Wollert, On ownership change Christian Wollert, Copia decreti on new mortgage laws in Amt Graudenz, On mortgage rules Christian Wollert Owners of Gr. The story unfolds step by step with relentless causality, focused on action, and presented with great effect schalke uefa cup lingering on detail. Casino spiele mit echtgeld is there a conscious plan benutzernamen generator deutsch produce books which nullify the potential for creativity and critical thinking in children. Any real estate holding usually means that there were and paradise casino still are today deed and mortgage records Grund- und Hypotheken-Acten which were administered gopro hero 4 geant casino the Amtsgericht. Here many wetten dass online anschauen must be taken into consideration. The problem with satires, however, is that their topicality usually constitutes a block to later understanding as the targets of humor fade into obscurity. Let us forget the common and probably deliberate confusion of llamas and lamas in the Himalayas. The heroes and the heroines are the collective. The major figures are from the working class, and the contents of the stories are, broadly speaking, of utmost concern lucky louie online casino the underprivileged in society and lead to developing class consciousness. Like spanische pokal the other characters in Der Struwwelpeterhinterherschieben has been drawn in an emphatically clumsy manner. The pictures are likely to give child readers the idea that they could easily achieve something like that as well, a first step towards overcoming dislike.

    Where the left-right division of the page is concerned, we may observe that the angel is positioned in the middle of the top section. This position is mirrored by the boy in the bottom section.

    The ethereal nature of the angelic creature is emphasized by the fact that its feet are hidden from view. It is not grounded in any sort of way, it simply floats, in contrast to the picture of the boy at the dinner table, which conspicuously displays the legs of both table and chair, firmly putting the boy on the ground.

    Thus, the frontispiece turns heaven and earth into contiguous domains. In other words, there is a certain give-and-take between heaven and earth.

    These connotations will prove to be important to the interpretation of the picture book as a whole, as I shall point out later on. Turning the page, we are confronted with the title story.

    It features the icon of a boy on an ornamental pedestal sporting exceedingly long hair and fingernails. The pedestal is decorated by a comb and a scissors, which flank the inscription of the accompanying text as ornamental trophies.

    The words of the title story are uttered by the same "voice of authority" who produced the lines on the frontispiece, namely an external narrator who does not figure as a character in the scenes presented to us.

    The messages uttered on the frontispiece and the title story are complementary to each other. In the first case, juvenile readers are lured into identification with the obedient children in the pictures through the promise of a gift, while they are discouraged from identifying themselves with the filthy boy in the title story through the threat of physical discomfort.

    Shock-headed Peter is offered up to the juvenile reader as an object of ridicule and disgust. The public is supposed to scoff at him, in unison with the external narrator.

    The title story exhorts the audience to bond with the voice of authority at the expense of the young protagonist of the story, who is put in the pillory as a target of disidentification.

    The word-image dynamic in the title story is theatrical rather than dramatic in the strict sense of the word. The verbal story represents the events from the point of view of the child hero, but in the pictures the main characters tend to figure as the object rather than the subject of focalization, that is, the picture represents the child, rather than the field of vision of the main character.

    In the case of Der Struwwelpeter , both words and pictures are external. Shock-headed Peter does not get to speak a single line, nor do the other children in the stories that are to follow, but for the one exception of "Suppen-Kaspar".

    Just like the frontispiece, this already gives us a foretaste of the tight fit between the words and the pictures of Der Struwwelpeter. The pictures act out the words quite literally and vice versa.

    The juvenile reader is invited to cast a scornful glance upon this depraved child and therefore the accompanying picture puts him up for exposure.

    The frontispiece and the title story together set the stage for what is to follow. They suggest that we will be presented with a collection of cautionary tales which instill notions of appropriate behaviour into the audience by confronting readers with the consequences of certain deeds.

    These consequences function as so many rewards or punishments mostly the latter. At first glance, the subsequent stories seem to meet these expectations.

    If we want to subsume the misdeeds in the Struwwelpeter stories under a common denominator, one could say that the various child protagonists are all guilty of being unable to control their spontaneous bodily impulses.

    As soon as they begin to move about while giving in to this or that urgent inclination, they are in for trouble. In other words, they all fail to conform to the quiet and subdued types of behaviour displayed by the frontispiece.

    In general, there hardly seems to be any need for human intention or intervention here. Evil punishes itself in Der Struwwelpeter through merciless cause-and-effect chains that are forged by ineradicable natural laws.

    Words and pictures closely cooperate to evoke the appearance of objectivity and inevitability in the Struwwelpeter stories.

    The pictures indeed obey rigid codes in certain respects. The critical moment at which a child decides to ignore an interdiction is always clearly indicated by visual signs.

    Except for "Suppen-Kaspar", the child protagonists are drawn en face as long as they stay in their proper place. They are drawn en profil as soon as they decide to follow their own impulses, which is always a sure sign that their lives will be at stake within a few moments.

    Furthermore, the pictures tend to represent the consequences of the deeds that are reported in the verbal text In other words, the pictures usually depict phenomena that succeed the events recorded by the words.

    If we are told that "Suppen-Kaspar" literally starves himself to death, the final picture does not show his corpse, but his tombstone.

    A rather humorless word-picture dynamic, or so it seems! At this point, one may well wonder how the epithets "lustig" and "drollig" apply to the Struwwelpeter stories.

    What could possibly be so funny about all this? It is time for a second look. If we subject the visual narrativity of Der Struwwelpeter to a closer analysis, we may chance upon a whole array of features that complicate the comments given in the above.

    Let us return to the title story for a moment. I have suggested that the child protagonist is presented to the juvenile reading audience as a target of scorn.

    However, the style in which Shock-headed Peter has been drawn invites us to reconsider this interpretation. Like all the other characters in Der Struwwelpeter , he has been drawn in an emphatically clumsy manner.

    This is how children draw puppets: Although Hoffmann earned his living as a doctor and dabbled in the composition of picture books, this does not mean that he could not do any better than that.

    The pictures are likely to give child readers the idea that they could easily achieve something like that as well, a first step towards overcoming dislike.

    Furthermore, although the verbal text indeed emphatically pillories this filthy child, the fact of the matter is that the picture which literally incorporates the text has not really put him in a pillory but on a monumental, decorated pedestal, which is a sign of honor rather than humiliation.

    Lastly, Shock-headed Peter does not betray even the faintest trace of shame or regret. He neither cowers nor casts down his eyes.

    On the contrary, he stares back at the spectator in defiance. True enough, words and pictures concur very closely indeed in Der Struwwelpeter , apparently leaving hardly any room for the ironical freedom of interpretation that picture books are appreciated for nowadays.

    But as a matter of fact, their fit is a little too close for comfort, and this is exactly the point at which irony comes into play. This hyperbolic image evokes bathos rather than pathos.

    Moreover, it casts doubt upon the preceding sequence of events. If the cats are apparently able to call forth this much water, why did they not do so before in order to quench the flames consuming poor Harriet?

    Once doubt begins to creep in, we may notice another tell-tale detail in the final picture, namely the purple ribbons in the tails of the cats. In the case of the tearful cats, there is a strong congruence between words and pictures, because the picture takes the verbal metaphor literally.

    An even more salient example of this device is offered by the tailor in the story about the thumb-sucker. Although the punishment of the thumb-sucker is perhaps the most frightening episode of all, its cruelty is mitigated by the way in which the tailor has been drawn.

    The tailor wielding the scissors is really a big pair of scissors himself: One does not encounter such creatures in everyday life: A close reading of the illustrations reveals, however, that visual balance and symmetry undermine rather than uphold the hierarchy between adult authorities and disobedient children.

    Take, for instance, the symmetries in the top-bottom and left-right segmentation of the page. As I have already remarked in my analysis of the frontispiece, several pages in this picture book have a three-tiered lay-out.

    In the visual prologue, the top layer featuring "das Christkind" is suggestive of a spiritual realm, while the two layers below connote quotidian reality and the realm of our basic bodily drives.

    The three pages that make up this story have an identical tripartite segmentation, but it conflates the semantic connotations of higher and lower levels of being.

    The realm of quotidian reality which is capable of redemption through the descent of the heavenly creature in the visual prologue, has been downgraded to the bottom of the page, while the middle section pictures Frederick sadistically tearing off the wings of a fly, which are faintly reminiscent of the winged angel in the top section of the visual prologue.

    Obviously, there is no aspiration towards transcendence in this story. The conflation of higher and lower levels of being is aggravated on the second page, through the visual trickery with the stairway.

    One would expect movement to proceed from bottom to top, as we see Frederick climbing the stairs leading him from the bottom section to the top section of the page.

    However, the order of events as narrated by the words proceeds from top to bottom: These events also reveal that the lower species the animal triumphs over the higher one the human , an illegitimate victory which is consummated in the third and last page of the story.

    The chair and table are exactly identical to the pieces of furniture which occupied the bottom section of the frontispeice.

    Here they have moved one place up. The realm of quotidian reality has made way for the realm of the instinctual. This is not as it should be.

    This destabilization of the hierarchy between the spiritual, the quotidian and the instinctual is not unique to this story, as a comparison with "Die Geschichte von den schwarzen Buben" points out.

    This story also opens with the three-tiered set-up that we have grown familiar with by now. The middle section shows two boys with toys, while the bottom section represents a boy with food a pretzel , appropriately enough.

    In the concluding page, the hierarchy between up and down which was already in disarray to begin with has disappeared entirely: Here, again, the higher has succumbed to the lower rather than the other way around.

    Where the left-right segmentation of the page is concerned, the Struwwelpeter stories also cause confusion.

    Within the Western pictorial tradition, convention has it that movement proceeds from the left to the right side of the picture.

    In Der Struwwelpeter , however, movement may proceed in both directions, which makes it difficult to infer priority from the visual information.

    On the first page of "Die Geschichte von den schwarzen Buben", the young black-a-moor is walking along from left to right. In the fourth and last page of the story, however, he is walking in the opposite direction, together with Kaspar, Ludwig and Wilhelm.

    The continual conflations of the upper and lower levels and the left and right sides of the page graphically embody the instability of hierarchy in the Struwwelpeter stories.

    This instability is epitomized in a recurrent motif in both the visual and the verbal component of this picture book, namely the interchange-ability of humans and animals.

    Like animals, children are considered to be prone to their instincts, contrary to adults, who have undergone a civilizing process.

    In Der Struwwelpeter , however, both children and adults give way to animals. As has already become apparent from my analysis of the page layout, there are strong resonances between the pictures of the various Struwwelpeter stories.

    The boy in the bottom section of the first page of the story about the inky boys holds the pretzel in his hand that is displayed in the top right corner of the frontispiece.

    The soup that the good boy in the bottom section of the frontispiece is eating returns in the story about "Suppen-Kaspar". It is not just visual structures and objects that recur from one story to another.

    The motif of submersion, for instance, figures quite prominently in Der Struwwelpeter. In the fourth story, the three boys mocking the young black-a-moor are submerged in a well of ink by Saint Nicholas.

    The wild hunter seeks refuge in a well, while "Hans Guck-in-die-Luft" nearly drowns in a river. Once we have registered the recurrence of the element Water, we may grow sensitive towards the presence of the other three elements as well.

    The element Earth is introduced in the fifth story, when the wild hunter lays down on the ground in order to take a nap, which is the beginning of his undoing.

    It is prominent in the story about "Suppen-Kaspar" who starves and is buried underground, while it returns in the story about "Zappel-Philipp", who undergoes a pseudo-burial as he falls down to the ground and is subsequently buried underneath the table-cloth and all the dishes it supported.

    The element Air, finally, is introduced in the frontispiece through the winged angel who dwells in heaven, it returns in the temptation of "Hans Guck-in-die-Luft" who cannot take his eyes from the sky above, while it dominates the story about flying Robert.

    On a yet higher level of abstraction, one could point to rhymes between the ways in which the pages are structured, which I have already discussed to some extent.

    There is still a device that demands our attention within this context, namely the artful ways in which Hoffmann has framed the pages of his picture book.

    It is not just that the characters tend to be put up for view on pedestals, stages and placed against the background of theatrical backdrops, it is also that both words and pictures are unified into one visual whole by elaborate decorations that frame the page and thereby visually emphasize the fact that these narrative episodes are products of art, rather than slices of life.

    As these framing devices became more and more elaborate and emphatic when Hoffmann revised and expanded the collection of stories for the edition, we may legitimately suppose that he attached considerable importance to them.

    They are prominent to the extreme in the final story, whose scenes are literally surrounded by portrait frames. In other words, the three episodes constituting the story of flying Robert are presented to the reader as paintings that are hanging up on the wall.

    The great Nicholas in the fourth story has command over a gigantic pen and an equally formidable ink-well. The boys emerging out of his ink-well look like silhouettes or papercuts.

    It is impossible to mistake them for real boys, if only because they maintain one and the same bodily posture throughout the story, no matter what happens to them.

    The Nicholas who wields the gigantic quill represents authorship, and as such, he reminds the audience of the fact that the creatures they are presented with are really figments of the imagination.

    As this blatantly unrealistic episode is linked up with other episodes through the device of visual rhyme, it is suggested that the other protagonists are cardboard figures as well.

    A close reading of the pictorial aspects of Der Struwwelpeter enables us to become somewhat more specific about the narrativity of pictures.

    As I have remarked before, the verbal stories come across as cautionary tales in the first instance, which teach children that if you do x, y will inevitably happen.

    This collection of stories seems to feature a relatively arbitrary selection of ordinary German children, carrying ordinary German names such as "Friederich", "Kaspar" or "Konrad.

    However, this generic categorization becomes problematic when we are prepared to give equal weight to the visual aspects of the Struwwelpeter stories.

    In the case of a photonarrative, a particular selection of shots has been arranged in such a way that a story emerges.

    Likewise, Hoffmann has arranged the pictures making up the various Struwwelpeter stories in such a way that a story emerges even without the support of the verbal text.

    These visual stories are a lot more playful and subversive than their verbal counterparts. Furthermore, in the case of photo-narratives, any photograph in the series may be linked up with any other photograph on the basis of some resemblance between the scene depicted, the types of shot used, or the print characteristics.

    These translinear networks of comparable photographs may be suggestive of yet another storyline. In other words, visual rhymes link up episodes which are not directly related through chronology or causality, which generates the third or more storyline s.

    How would all this affect the interpretation of Der Struwwelpeter? The visual rhymes pertaining to, for instance, the play with the four elements, suggest that the various Struwwelpeter stories represent rites of passage.

    The protagonists are subject to archaic trials by fire, water, earth and air. These trials are all extremely dangerous, as any proper rite of passage should be.

    The protagonists gradually mature through their struggles with the four elements. The boy who carries a whip in the frontispiece is younger than the boy who whips his nanny in the second story.

    The filthy child in the title story is younger than flying Robert. The ageing process is visualized quite emphatically in the ninth story.

    The Hans who is dragged out of the river is significantly older than the Hans who has his eye on the swallows in the first picture.

    At the opening of the story, Hans is still a small, chubby boy with an open and innocent expression on his face. The boy who finally emerges from the water is considerably taller and thinner, and his introverted facial expression clearly indicates that he has grown sadder and wiser.

    Thus, while the series of the various Struwwelpeter stories seems to deal with the adventures of an arbitrary selection of children that are unrelated to each other, the set evoked by the visual rhymes sketches the contours of a rudimentary Bildungsroman , which relates the coming-of-age of a young Everyman.

    This climax has puzzled many a reader who argues in favour of the repressive nature of Der Struwwelpeter , as flying does not really seem to be much of a punishment.

    However, as a conclusion to a set which is suggestive of a Bildungsroman , it begins to make sense. Let me first point out that we have come full circle when Robert takes off.

    His flight refers back to the frontispiece. The visual prologue depicts a heavenly creature who may descend to earth in order to distribute gifts, most notably, a picture book.

    This product of the imagination may lift the minds of those who are fortunate enough to receive it. The final scene depicts an earthly being who ascends to heaven.

    This scene is emphatically presented to us as another product of the imagination, that is, a painting. Thus, the promise of transcendence offered by the prologue is fulfilled in the final scene.

    Perhaps the order in which the stories are presented to us is not all that arbitrary after all. Having come this far, we may now intervene in the perennial debate about the pedagogical implications of Der Struwwelpeter in an informed manner.

    This point of view became truly dominant in the sixties and seventies, when anti-authoritarian approaches to child rearing became popular amongst the highly educated elite.

    The moderates grant that Hoffmann was indeed intent on instilling the conventional Biedermeier catalogues of vices and virtues into the hearts and minds of his young audience, but they also have it that the stories contain subliminal messages that do not tally with established pedagogical lore.

    In fact, he was frequently taken to task for the ironical, playful aspects of his stories, which undermined their apparently pedagogical purposes.

    Critics particularly found fault with his illustrations, which, they felt, were too "fratzenhaft" frolicsome and as such, made fun of adult authorities.

    They were dead right. Der Struwwelpeter does not teach established morality. One could say that it teaches children certain things about the power of the imagination.

    In other words, one could regard Der Struwwelpeter as a form of aesthetic education, which gives children an idea of sublimation, which is something entirely different from repression.

    A close reading of Der Struwwelpeter suggests that irony may even arise when words and pictures represent the exact same events and characters.

    However, this does not necessarily prove that irony is endemic in the picture book, as Nodelman would have it. In other words, the presence and degree of irony in a picture book is supposedly directly proportional to the discrepancies between the verbal and the visual story.

    But irony is not necessarily a case of divergence on the level of story components, as I have tried to point out. Maybe the taxonomical effort fails to reach its goal because critics still have not found an effective vocabulary for analyzing this genre.

    In any case, one should always try to select those concepts that enable the critic to come to terms with the artifactual nature of the picture book, its inherent materiality, or, in other words, with the contents of the form.

    Hoffmann published the first edition of his picture book in , which contained five stories in all. My references are to this edition, which contains the following stories, besides the frontispiece and the title story:.

    The term is used by Andrea Schwenke Wyile to refer to books "wherein the overall meaning of the text is achieved by the interplay between the words and the pictures" Schwenke Wyile It is, however, strongly theatrical, in the sense that somebody is put up for display and the audience is explicitly invited to look at him.

    Johannes Baumgartner, Der Struwwelpeter: This does not imply that sets always generate stories. Sets are not necessarily narrative. However, in this collection of stories, they certainly are.

    This concept originated in the anti-authoritarian pedagogical climate of the seventies of the previous century. See Sipe for a survey of the various metaphors used to designate the word-image relation in the picture book.

    Baumgartner, Johannes, Der Struwwelpeter: Dahrendorf, Malte, "Der Ideologietransport in der klassischen Kinderliteratur: Frey, Charles, "Heinrich Hoffmann: Struwwelpeter," in The Literary Heritage of Childhood: An Appraisal of Classics in the Western Tradition.

    Charles Frey and John Griffith, eds. Fischer Taschenbuch Verlag, Lewis, David, "Going along with Mr Gumpy: Nodelman, Perry, Words about Pictures: The University of Georgia Press, Nodelman, Perry, "The Eye and the I: New Haven and London: Yale University Press, Petzold, Diete, "Die Lust am erhobenen Zeigefinger: Ries, Hans, "Der Struwwelpeter: Thiele, Jens, Das Bilderbuch: A Nazi Story Book.

    Both Germany and the United States have moralistic traditions of childhood instruction reaching back to the formative periods of their cultural origins.

    Punishment made vivid by its violence is a didactic theme that spans the centuries. The verses in this work were accompanied by moral lessons that drew pointed conclusions for young readers about the application of the stories to their life and conduct.

    Demers and Moyles In the German tradition, this moralistic and religious strain was counterbalanced somewhat in the nineteenth century by a more scientifically-oriented informational genre, the "Sachbuch," or informational book, which originated in the works of Johann Amos Comenius Orbis Pictus and Johann Bernhard Basedow Ein Vorrath der besten Erkenntnisse.

    Was soll damit ein Kind, dem man einen Tisch und einen Stuhl abbildet? I saw all sorts of things in the bookstores, expertly drawn, glowingly painted, fairy tales, stories, scenes of life among Indians and robbers.

    What is a child supposed to do with the reproduction of a table or a chair? What the child sees in the book is a table and a chair, whether it is larger or smaller; it just is a table, whether the child can sit at it or on it or not.

    And to talk of original or copy, greater or smaller, is simply out of the question…. What his brief critique of the folio volume reveals is his imaginative capacity to envision how a child is likely to perceive objects represented in a book.

    Perhaps the most revealing phrase of Hoffmann is "was es in dem Buche sieht, das ist ihm ein Stuhl und ein Tisch … ob es daran oder darauf sitzen kann oder nicht.

    He insists that, to the child, the object is not an abstraction or a concept, but rather a real object: Twain objected to the sentimental and didactic abstraction of much literature available to or aimed at young audiences in the American republic.

    He cannot be said to have been free from it so much as to have made a radical departure within it. The good little boy is Jacob Blivens, and he is destroyed by a nitroglycerine explosion.

    He loved to live, you know, and this was the most unpleasant feature about being a Sunday-School book boy.

    He knew it was not healthy to be good" qtd. Like Hoffmann, he was somewhat embarrassed by the enormous success of some of his works and would have preferred to have acquired a more serious reputation for the work he considered his best and most important.

    As he wrote, " Struwwelpeter is the best known book in Germany, and has the largest sale known to the book trade, and the widest circulation" , 9.

    In a time when the members of the Clemens family, as his daughter Clara later wrote, "were compelled to spend every German mark as if it were an American dollar," "owing to financial losses," any scheme to turn a quick profit was appealing.

    Samuel Clemens placed his translation of Struwwelpeter , carefully wrapped and adorned with a huge red ribbon, beneath the Christmas tree.

    He seated himself near the tree and read the verses aloud in his inimitable, dramatic manner. He was a good actor! He knew the verses by heart and required only the uncertain light of the candles to prevent his getting off the rhythmical path.

    Jean and Susie and I were very youthful and susceptible. And how we laughed when he eloquently pictured the careless Hans walking straight into the pond among all the little fishes!

    All because the poor boy could not remove his eyes from the sky! There is an impious spirit of contrariness in the verses of this work that appealed to Father, suffering as he was from the blue Berlin mood of those first few weeks.

    The man who dipped the recalcitrant boy into the ink-bottle was after his own heart. How often had Father wanted to dip interrupting intruders into his own ink-bottle and watch them slink away in a black garb of shining fluid!

    Significantly, Clara finds the "impious spirit of contrariness" in both child and adult in Slovenly Peter. The Pain-killer "was simply fire in liquid form," but Aunt Polly is convinced that it is good for Tom, until Peter goes on a wild rampage after receiving a treatment of it.

    Peter sprang a couple of yards in the air, and then delivered a war-whoop and set off round and round the room, banging against furniture, upsetting flower pots, and making general havoc.

    Next he rose on his hind feet and pranced around, in a frenzy of enjoyment, with his head over his shoulder and his voice proclaiming his unappeasable happiness.

    Then he went tearing around the house, again spreading chaos and destruction in his path. Aunt Polly entered in time to see him throw a few double somersets, deliver a final mighty hurrah, and sail through the open window, carrying the rest of the flower-pots with him.

    Aunt Polly felt a sudden pang of remorse. This was putting the thing in a new light; what was cruelty to a cat might be cruelty to a boy too.

    Here Mark Twain has reversed the customary didactic relationship. Lewis Carroll achieved a similar purpose in Alice in Wonderland when he satirized stories in which "friends" the Rationalist euphemism for adult authority figures taught children lessons such as "if you cut your finger very deeply with a knife, it usually bleeds" However, Mark Twain dramatized the conflict, not merely as a battle between pedagogical styles, but as a question of perspective and values.

    The hunter is near-sighted, like Aunt Polly. He goes out "to have some fun," as the translation glosses his intention. Hoffmann was more blunt: Gibson translates it in Der Struwwelpeter Polyglott , "to see the hare and shoot him dead.

    The hunter succumbs to his weaknesses as a human being: What follows is a carnivalesque comedy: Incidentally, perhaps the figure of the hare with the spectacles and gun also foreshadows, though it is probably too audacious to assert that it inspired, the character of the imperious White Rabbit with his white kid-gloves, coat, and watch on a chain in Alice in Wonderland.

    Here, as elsewhere in Struwwelpeter , the density and intensity of physical sensations is noteworthy: Hoffmann extrapolates familiar sensations and figures into grotesque exaggerations that are still linked to the familiar through elements of the mundane.

    Jack Zipes points out in an essay published in that "no clear-cut reasons are given for the behavior or for the punishment" in Struwwelpeter , and he indicts the book for glorifying obedience to arbitrary authority Some critics have recoiled from the violence of these tales, as Thomas Freeman does in an essay in the Journal of Popular Culture , in which he states "I do not agree that these poems can be justified as suitable reading material for small children.

    Both the stories of Conrad and Paulina play upon some of the worst fears which can torment a child" Freeman attacks the lessons of the stories as he sees them: Instead we are told to behave—or else" While the stories—verses and pictures—have undoubted cautionary and instructional content, they are also suffused with a wry combination of humor, extravagance, and pragmatism.

    Even the stories with the clear, unquestionable morals have an odd, distinct quality that transcends their teaching purpose. One way of examining this odd quality is to say that there are two conflicting, yet equally valid ways of regarding this book.

    The first is that Hoffmann evokes, through a vivid exploration of its opposite, a comfortable childhood world in which children do not burn to death, are not dipped in ink or bitten by a dog until they bleed, do not have their thumbs cut off, do not starve to death, or even normally pull tablecloths onto the floor, fall into canals, or fly away in storms—except in their imaginations.

    The other, perhaps complementary way of regarding this book is to see it as a work in which children are the central actors. This is not a realm of dry, factual information, nor is it a realm in which adults are in the foreground.

    It is an active stage, with energetic, assertive figures, starkly outlined, sometimes surprisingly alone.

    In existential isolation, boldly disobedient characters defy authority and suffer the consequences. If one were to imagine the improbable fiction of a child reared entirely upon a diet of Struwwelpeter and nothing else, it would be more likely to say, as an adult, "Here I stand, I can do no other," or "Give me liberty or give me death" than "Life has no meaning" or "Hell is other people.

    What, then, does Mark Twain, the archetypal American author, do with this very German set of stories? Samuel Clemens devoted considerable energy to learning the German language and chronicled some of his frustration with the complexities of German grammar in his essay "The Awful German Language," published as an appendix to A Tramp Abroad in He was confounded by the many cases and difficult declinations, but he turned his frustration into comedy, coining some of the most hilarious descriptions of German linguistic practices ever.

    In German a young lady has no sex, while a turnip has. Think what overwrought reverence that shows for the turnip and what callous disrespect for the girl….

    I translate this from a conversation in one of the best German Sunday-school books:. To continue with the German genders: Horses are sexless, dogs are male, cats are female—tomcats included, of course.

    The inventor of the language probably got what he knew about a conscience from hearsay. Twain was one of the great cultural interpreters of his time, writing widely-circulated books that influenced how Americans saw Europe and Europeans.

    In A Tramp Abroad and elsewhere, he represented German culture with a mixture of reverence, irreverent comedy, satire, and frustration.

    He described romantic scenes such as the Lorelei and the castle at Heidelberg with relish, but he was particularly fascinated by the elaborate rituals of the Burschenschaften student fraternities at the university, and described their duels in great detail.

    He pretended to raft down the Neckar as one would raft down the Mississippi River, and he wrote a brief burlesque of a Black Forest novel, which turns on the question of whose manure pile is the largest.

    The great difficulty that Twain faced in translating Struwwelpeter was to retain some of the idiomatic flavor of the original while still writing rhyming verse.

    One can think of the effort of translation as a scale of choices, from literal on the one side to highly interpretive and inventive on the other.

    The dangers of the literal approach include woodenness, incomprehensibility, or awkwardness because of idioms, metaphors, or phrases that are not used in the target language.

    Word-for-word translation tends towards lifelessness and artificiality. The perils at the other end of the scale are obvious: As Mark Twain himself stated, "Poetry is a sandy road to travel, and the only way to pull through at all is to lay your grammar down and take hold with both hands.

    Twain loved to dramatize intellectual labor as struggle and conflict, as is evident in his violent metaphors throughout his humorous essays and speeches about the German language.

    As in his writings about Germany in A Tramp Abroad and elsewhere, Twain puts a selective and distinctly American spin on the material.

    By intensifying certain elements that are present in the original, he estranges them from their culture of origin and puts a specifically American and Twainian stamp on them.

    Twain translates the description of the "kohlpechraben-schwarzer Moor" rather literally as the "coal-pitch-raven-black young Moor.

    He also calls the boy "that poor pitch-black piteous Moor," and, most offensively, "that Niggerkin. Similarly, Twain intensifies the violence of the story in American frontier fashion.

    Waves his shears, the heartless grub, And calls for Dawmenlutscher-bub. Meantime the atlas, gone astray, Has drifted many yards away.

    What I am suggesting is that Twain adds a strong flavor of fascination with the absurd, grotesque, and violent to his rendition, going considerably beyond the "spirit of the original.

    Hoffmann mentions the wine as a matter of course; Twain, coming from a society in which alcohol was a subject of religious controversy, emphasizes it with libertine pleasure in the violation of taboo.

    In A Tramp Abroad , he pursued a similar theme when he wrote about relations of German professors with their students:.

    There seems to be no chilly distance existing between the German students and the professor but, on the contrary, a companionable intercourse, the opposite of chilliness and reserve.

    When the professor enters a beer-hall in the evening where students are gathered these rise up and take off their caps and invite the old gentleman to sit with them and partake.

    He accepts and the pleasant talk and the beer flow for an hour or two, and by and by the professor, properly charged and comfortable, gives a cordial good night, while the students stand bowing and uncovered.

    And then he moves on his happy way homeward with all his vast cargo of learning afloat in his hold. Nobody finds fault or feels outraged.

    No harm has been done. It is utterly unprincipled and outrageous to say ate when you mean eat, and you must never do it except when crowded for a rhyme" Except in translating" Mark Twain emphasizes himself as the interpreter and teller of the tales, which he embellishes with themes that are preoccupations of the frontier.

    Yet Mark Twain misses something essentially German in the original, and substitutes something quintessentially American in the process. Perhaps his subtly eccentric interpretation of the "Story of Flying Robert" provides an aptly epigrammatic conclusion symbolic of this transposition.

    Hoffmann concludes with the cryptic image of an unknowable fate that befalls boy, umbrella, and hat as they are carried away:. Though Hoffmann emphasizes universal limits: But Twain describes it thus:.

    Oh, where on high can that hat be? When you find out, pray come tell me. Ein Vorrath der besten Erkenntnisse. New York and London: Demers, Patricia and Gordon Moyles, eds.

    From Instruction to Delight: Geschichte des deutschen Jugendbuches. His Songs and His Sayings. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

    Walter Blair and Victor Fischer. Berkeley, Los Angeles and London: U of California P, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Oxford and New York: The March-banks Press, Harold Begbie and F.

    Petrol Peter ; The Marlborough Struwwelpeter ; The Modern Struwwelpeter ; and a couple of Guinness advertising booklets produced during the s and later.

    The problem with satires, however, is that their topicality usually constitutes a block to later understanding as the targets of humor fade into obscurity.

    Working with Emile Levassor, he put this vehicle on sale in , and it was still a novelty in In the picture, the dog takes the place and role of the doctor sitting next to the bed where the heavily bandaged Adolphus lies prostrate.

    The drivers of the earliest roofless motorcars needed to be thickly clad for their journeys, and for this animal-like appearance Struwwelpeter himself provided a grotesque model.

    The eponymous Petrol Peter is wrapped up in a dirty fur coat, wears goggles and a big hat, and has hands filthy from dealing with the car.

    Like many other inventions, the motorcar was perceived as both fascinating and dangerous, and its enthusiasts were regarded as objects of derision.

    In his guise as a washerwoman, having taken over the steering wheel of a car whose driver offered him a lift, he gives voice to his monomania: I am the Toad, the motor car snatcher, the prison-breaker, the Toad who always escapes!

    Sit still, and you shall know what driving really is, for you are in the hands of the famous, the skilful, the entirely fearless Toad!

    The sentiments expressed in The Wind in the Willows have the same flavor of fantastic comic adventure we find in Petrol Peter , but the earlier book, like its source, has a sharper edge to it.

    Unlike Harriet, Henry survives; but the destruction of his car, now reduced to "some twisted scrap," is described as a thousand pounds gone up in smoke.

    Their cars are "forfeit to the Crown. Females figure even less often in the stories of Petrol Peter than in Struwwelpeter. Dealing with world travel, it satirizes our insouciant hero as he nearly comes to grief with a llama in the Himalayas and alligators in the Amazon.

    Let us forget the common and probably deliberate confusion of llamas and lamas in the Himalayas. Two natives rescue poor Johnny from the river, while the alligators commiserate:.

    Sir Quinbus, who was once "as slim as slim could be," now has a powerful Napier to drive, gives up his horse, and as a result becomes as fat as Daniel Lambert, who weighed pounds at his death.

    Petrol Peter satirizes a new fashion and a select section of society—those wealthy enough to afford the huge expense of a motorcar—and there is a good deal of comedy at the expense of those who were daring or foolhardy enough to try out this new means of locomotion.

    Archibald Williams wrote a variety of books on engineering, railways, modern inventions, exploration, and things to make, so his humor is accordingly affectionate rather than envious or mordant.

    But the nature of his commentary and his allusions in Petrol Peter make it plain that he was writing for a comfortably off, middle- to upper-class readership.

    The Marlborough Struwwelpeter , by A. Williams probably no relation to Archibald , 5 was aimed at the same readership but a more restricted audience.

    It was published not by one of the major London publishing houses, but by the "Times" Office, Marlborough, and its chief purchasers were presumably present and former pupils of Marlborough College, their parents and relatives, and the teachers and staff.

    The college, one of the leading Victorian public schools, opened on 20 August , when two hundred boys of all ages up to sixteen arrived at its portals.

    By the time Arthur de Coetlogon Williams entered the school in September , it had celebrated its jubilee and established its own character.

    The Marlborough Struwwelpeter is the product of an eighteen-year-old still at school. The illustrations clearly depict the same person.

    Various other boys are also named, usually with nicknames, so it is impossible to identify any of them with certainty. He was clearly a figure of some authority, the author of An Introduction to Greek Sculpture If one takes away the stiff Edwardian shirt collar, this description fits the traditional schoolboy for much of the twentieth century.

    The next story is of "Cruel Dux," that is, the captain of the house rugby team, who attacks even his house prefect and his forward, who is busily engaged in brewing tea and cooking sausage and mash on a little gas ring placed on top of a book.

    Dux, however, has miscalculated with the forward, who strikes back with a blow to the face that sends the captain to bed "in Sicker," namely, the sick bay.

    The muffins that he is offered on a "steward stick" are "enough to make him sick," as he can hear the match in the distance.

    The story ends with a comically appalling rhyme: Smoking seems to have always been a problem for school authorities. We are thus not surprised to see "Harriet and the Matches" transformed with little effort into "The Dreadful Story about Tomkins and the Tobacco.

    The role of the cats is interestingly modified. They are guilty of that very English sin of being prigs. Only when they drop "their moralising fads" are they able to become "quite decent lads" and be included in the group again.

    I assume these are exercises in composing Latin verse, at this time a staple of the process of learning Latin and especially the quantity of syllables.

    As mentioned earlier, Jonathan is one of the other boys, and the one who faces him on the other side of the picture is a black youth, presumably the one called Bambasta.

    The "Good Sergeant Patrick" mentioned in the last few lines of the story does not figure in the college register or the history, but no doubt he was a real person.

    Occasionally a ball would be driven into the common room windows. Eventually the nuisance caused the game to be modified and wickets to be chalked instead on a wall skirting the Bath road.

    In the game was described as dragging on a hole-and-corner existence. Robert, the boy who replaces Conrad in this story, is a devotee of Snob and is warned to avoid the game by a plump red-coated, white-haired gentleman referred to as "Uncle.

    Robert is punished by having his legs struck off by Mr. Grace — , who scored his hundredth century in first-class cricket in He was a regular and much admired visitor to the college.

    Consequently, for lack of exercise, he grows so fat that on the fifth day he bursts. His success causes his head to swell and his pink-and-yellow waistcoat and crude-colored socks to buoy him up in the air.

    He commits the unpardonable sin of being stuck up and above the rest. The book thus ends with these lines:. Instead, I want to conclude with two of the advertising booklets produced by Arthur Guinness and Sons in celebration of their amazing product.

    Each booklet presents a Hoffmann character among a set of parodies of popular verses by authors as diverse as Mary and Jane Taylor, W.

    Gilbert, and Thomas Hood. Prodigies and Prodigals provides a hilarious take-off of "Fidgety Philip," whose nerves and lack of appetite are quickly cured.

    The result is a foregone conclusion. The Guinness booklets are the acme of advertising neatness and wit, adroit and genial adaptations of popular classics of verse to promote a product.

    The parodies I have looked at here are testimony to the adaptability of Struwwelpeter and its classic status as an English nursery book.

    Struwwelpeter has certainly declined in popularity in Britain since World War II , with the result that English parodies have disappeared.

    The processes of socialization and education have to an overwhelming extent had their threatening and coercive aspect removed, so Struwwelpeter has gradually become an isolated phenomenon.

    Peter Skrine, Rosemary E. Wallbank-Turner, and Jonathan West Stuttgart: Zu einer unbekannten politischen Struwwelpeterparodie aus Indien," Aus dem Antiquariat , no.

    Kari Verlag Kathrin Richter, The term "peeler" is derived from the surname of Sir Robert Peel — , who with the Metropolitan Police Act in introduced the first disciplined police force into London.

    Until the age of nineteen he had been of reasonable proportions, though tall, but afterward he gradually increased in size and, after a period in which he was the keeper of the prison in Leicester, gained an additional income by charging people who wanted to see for themselves how corpulent he was.

    The Napier was a racing car produced by the firm of D. Napier and Son, the first leading manufacturer of such vehicles.

    In a Napier achieved a world land speed record of It was obviously much in the public eye and well suited for inclusion in Petrol Peter.

    Born on 27 September , our author is credited in the British Library catalogue with nothing other than The Marlborough Struwwelpeter. John Murray , Williams left Marlborough in midsummer and read Classical Moderations at Balliol College, Oxford, gaining a first-class degree and entering the Indian Civil Service in Some are deposited at the state archives in Gdansk, Bydgoszcz, Elblag, Olsztyn, Szczecin, Torun today, or remained in the regional court archives.

    Nobody published inventories and listings of court records. The law indicates that there is no statute of limitation for preserving or discarding court records.

    Franz Harder of Ohra had started to inventarize court records around for the Mennonite villages in West Prussia in a project "Westpreussen in aller Welt" which at that time was located in Zoppot near Danzig.

    Since nobody seems to be willing or able to compile an inventory of court records in former Prussia, it should be the goal of tourists who trace ancestors in Poland today to visit the Polish archives as well as the Polish regional courts or ratusz and ask for the whereabouts of records.

    Simple information should include time periods, number of volumes, names of villages covered, accessibility, contact address for these records.

    The records in regional courts are probably the most neglected with nobody apparently in charge and able to read and care for them.

    Tourists who discover them should try to persuade the powers in charge to have them transferred to state archives where trained archivists are better able to care and index them.

    Historical societies are well advised to make inventarizing Grund- and Hypotheken-Acten of Mennonite villages in Prussia a priority.

    In I received xerox copies of court records from the Bydgoszcz archives. From this and other correspondence I was able to draft a partial survey of available deed and mortgage records in Bydgoszcz: Goertz- Adrian; Franz- Peter, bis All call numbers of Amtsgericht Neuenburg are to be preceded by zesp.

    Lubin, Dragas had been tranferred from the Amtsgericht Graudenz Grudziadz jurisdiction in In order to limit copying costs and avoid having wrong and useless documents copied for lack of correct call numbers sygnaturas , I recommend that initially only the first 3 pages of all Hypotheken-Acta be copied of "your" village.

    After you receive them, you may want to send copies to interested people for analysis and publication to spread the word?

    The analysis of the first 3 pages should reveal the correct synatura of Hypotheken-Acta of "your" Hof, and you may want to order more pages to be copied.

    In , when I published Stammfolge "Goertz aus Gr. Starke-Verlag I could use only the Mennonite church records of Montau-Gruppe and the Lutheran records of Graudenz-Land to support what I could find from completed questionaires of family members.

    The data on II Thomas Gertzen page and his 14 children are still sketchy. Of special interest are the records of Hof Nr. Peter Goertz and The Hans Goertz of Kommerau court records are posted elsewhere on the mmhs site.

    In addition I render the following listing of settlers in Gross Lubin below: Verzeichnis der Einsassen des Dorfes Gr.

    Lubin im Jahre Mennonite Wirthe from the land census culm. Goertz - 9 - 8. Peter Goertz 1 19 - 2. Johann Wiegang 1 17 jetzt Christian Wollert 3.

    Johann Sturmowsky - 9 jetzt Joseph Sturmowsky 4. David Pauls 1 6 78 - 5. Peter Jantz 1 22 - 6. Peter Frantz 1 21 jetzt David Frantz 7.

    Johann Rahn 1 24 - 8. Stephan Baltzer 1 20 jetzt Witwe Baltzer 9. Abraham Goertz - 8 - Peter Dercks 2 24 - Isak Adrian 2 11 64 - Martin Boldt 3 4 - Michael Schmidt - 20 jetzt Michael Eichhorn Andreas Kirsau - 9 57 - Daniel Loefke - 3 jetzt Peter Loefcke 2.

    Christian Behrendt - 3 - 3. Frantz Kositzky - 3 - 4. Zacharias Ewert - 3 jetzt Jacob Penner 5. Peter Loefcke - 2 jetzt Jacob Loefcke 6.

    Wittwe Knutin - 2 38 jetzt die Erben 8. Heinrich Baltzer - - jetzt Franz Baltzer 9. David Roedder - 2 jetzt die Wittwe Roedder Peter Block - 1 jetzt Isaak Baltzer Gottfried Berg - 1 10 - Wittwe Preussin - 4 - jetzt Johann Bilau Johann Koehn - - jetzt Witwe Koehn Michael Utzing - 1 53 - Michael Dohrau - 3 jetzt Johann Dorau Wittwe Bahlau - 2 - Schul und Kirchhofsland - - - pages.

    Table of present and future taxes for Gr. Heinrich Wohlgemuth,jetzt Jacob Goertz jun. M ,hat anno die Witwe des Menn. Martin Boltz M ,ist schon zu polnischer Zeit im Besitz gewesen.

    Michael Schmidt, vorhin Peter Fick L. Isaac Adrian M ,erkauft von dem Menn. Peter Dirks M ,in eingeheiratet.

    Stephan Baltzer M ,ist schon zu polnischeer Zeit im Besitz gewesen. Johann Rahn L Abraham Goertz M ,in von Isaac Adrian erkauft.

    Peter Franz M ,besitzt diesen Hof aus polnischer Zeit her. Heinrich Goertz erkauft Johann Wigang L Groenke C , aus dem Hofe Nr. David Roeder L ,desgl.

    Christian Behrend L ,ad Hof Nr. David Loefke L , ad Nr. Michael Dorau L , ad Nr. Johann Preuss Witwe L , ad Nr. Johann Kuhn L , ad Nr.

    Peter Hiske L , ad Nr. Peter Franz gekauft und ist immer im Besitz der Mennoniten gewesen. Christian Behrend der sub Nr. Cammer Consens vom 5 Febr. The court language in olden as well as in modern times is not always intelligble.

    The handwriting is not always easily readable and is a challenge and good study material for history seminars.

    Here are some expressions and abbreviations which I found in the documents: Akt Sadu Obwodowego w Nowem Seite: Lubin, 2 Copia A: Nachlass der verstorbenen Maria Goertz geb.

    Lubin, 13 Copia C: Erbteilung des Peter Goertz, Gr. Nachlass der vertorbenen Anna Boltz geb. Balzer, Copia F.: Nachlass der verstorbenen Maria Schroeder geb.

    Siebrandt 35 Table of Contents: Akt Sadu Obwodowego w Nowem Page: Estate of deceased Maria Goertz geb. Estate partition of Peter Goertz, Gr.

    Lubin, Birth days of Peter Goertz children, Gr. Estate of deceased Anna Boltz geb. Balzer, Copia F: Estate of deceased Maria Schroeder geb.

    Actum Gross Lubin den Von dem Besizzer und dessen titulo possesesionis. Unrau durch die Geschworenen Grodt und Krzewiszinsky unterm Von den Schulden, real Verbindlichkeiten und Lasten April anno in der Ehrb.

    Claus Frantzen seine Behausung in Beisein der Ehrb. Klaus Frantz Mittnachbaar alhie auf Gr. Lubin an einem Theil und dem Ehrb.

    Es verkauft der Ehrb. Claus Frantz dem obbemeldeten Peter Goertzen seinen in Gr. Martin dieses sten Jahres fl und auf May wen wir schreiben werden fl und den Rest als fl auf S.

    Lubin im Jahr und Tag wie oben. Dass vorstehende Abschrift mit dem Original gleichstimmig ist, attestirt in fidem Gross Lubin d. April - gez.

    Ich Michael Dohrau habe die Kauf Summa richtig empfangen nehmlich fl wo von ich quittire Anno den 3. Vorstehende Abschrift stimmt mit dem producireten Original solches attestiret.

    Juni durch den Grodt und Krzewiszinsky aufgenommenen Inventario cum taxa. Heute indessen giebt der izzige Besizzer selber folgende Schulden zur ingrossation an.

    Siebrandt und ihrem nach der Mutter verstorbenen Bruder Thomas zugefallenen Erbtheile laut Erbrecess vom Diese fl 15 gr sind also zur ingrossation zu bemelden.

    Unrau laut Recess vom Juni zugestellten Erbtheil von rth 30 gr 9 pf welche gleichfalls auf dieser Immobile zur ingrossation zu notieren.

    May einzuziehen nachgegeben werde Peter Gertz - gez.

    Das Apokalyptische lag ihm weit näher. Neben der Tür versammelt ein Gemälde allerlei bürgerliches und politisches Personal in einer Barke, lauter Karikaturen, denen ein durch seinen Schnauzbart identifizierbarer Nietzsche den Hitlergruss entbietet. Not wanting Salvago to become more popular than himself as a result of the gift, Adorno casino texas holdem strategy to use the existence of the secret grotto as an excuse to veto the transfer. Die Gäste waren verwirrt, das Zimmer voller Rauchschwaden, durch welche die Fratzen an den weissen Wänden glotzten, Kerzenlicht, mein Vater wirkte gespenstisch in seiner notdürftigen Kleidung, er hatte nicht erwartet, einen Professor bei mir zu finden, entfernte sich, ich fühlte mich gedemütigt, man brach auf. Sunday, February 18, apron. So ganz wird der Gast die Atmosphäre der Dürrenmattschen Studentenbude nicht aufrufen casino restaurant bregenz. My gratitude goes to the KON-BigBand which played live later on the same day and provided the right background music for the video clip. Die Mansardenbilder wurden weiss übertüncht und blieben nur Eingeweihten in Erinnerung, darunter Dürrenmatts Schwester, deren Hinweise zur Freilegung der Malereien führten. In der Community könnt ihr euch über Themen austauschen, die euch interessieren. Wednesday, March 28, zither. Wir warten an diesem unnatürlichen Ort und natürlich bist du online casino free spins starburst entspannt. Und die hormonellen Wirrungen Heranwachsender werden zur Vampir-Teenie-Story verquirlt — ganz zum Entzücken des vornehmlich weiblichen und jungen Publikums. Vielleicht zusätzlich stimuliert durch Freiheitseuphorie. Unternehmen zur Wahl in Bayern: Auch ein ziemlich zorniges Frankenstein-Monster ist leicht zu zeichnen:

    Fratzen Gezeichnet Video

    Gezeichnete Hände

    2 thoughts on “Fratzen gezeichnet

    1. Wacker, diese bemerkenswerte Phrase fällt gerade übrigens

    2. das Unvergleichliche Thema, mir ist es sehr interessant:)

    Hinterlasse eine Antwort

    Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind markiert *